Thursday, July 29, 2021

I'm Dyeing Again--Dyeing Fabric, That Is

I recently purchased some Martha Nelson Thomas Doll Baby pre-sewn bodies from the 1980s. I also bought some Windsor Comfort fabric from etsy. It was called Pale Fawn. When it arrived, I was surprised at how white it was--nothing like the doll fabric. So I decided to buy some Rit DyeMore fabric dye for synthetic fabric. 

I used a large 12-quart stainless steel pot with 1.5 gallons of water, brought to a boil and 1 yard of fabric. I added a tiny squirt of dishsoap once it came to a boil, then added the dye, then the dry fabric.

First I tried 0.6ml each Sandstone and Apricot Orange. It wasn't the right color. 

So using the already dyed fabric, I tried 1.2ml each Red, Sandstone, and Apricot Orange. It was close to the same color but a little too orange. 

Then I tried 0.2ml red, and 1.2ml sandstone to the non-dyed piece of fabric. It did not change the color at all, as though the dye did not work.  I don't know if maybe the bottles had the wrong dye in it or what.  I tried it again and still, nothing changed.  So I came to conclusion that the sandstone and red were faulty.

Then I tried .6ml just apricot orange.  It was just a tad too light.  So I put it in again with a new batch of .6ml apricot orange.  It changed very slightly.  Here are the photos of the end results of the fabric next to a sample of Dolskin Flesh fabric, Windsor Comfort Flesh (no longer available), Windsor Comfort Pale Fawn, and the Presewn Doll Baby body...



The fabric that I dyed the first time, that I thought was too orange looks almost exactly like the Windsor Comfort Flesh.  The fabric that I dyed .6ml apricot once looks almost identical to the Dolskin Flesh.  After dyeing it a second time with the .6ml apricot looks very close to the Presewn Doll Baby body.  It is very hard to capture the correct color on camera and to match it on different screens since screens display colors differently.  I am really amazed at how close it came in color with just using apricot.  I suppose flesh tones are more of an orange color, after all.